Judge Hands 35 Years to First American Convicted of Trying to Join ISIS

Did you happen to see this?

A U.S. citizen convicted of trying to join the Islamic State did not get off easy.

Back on May 31, a federal judge sentenced the first American ever convicted of trying to wage jihad on behalf of ISIS to 35 years in prison.

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From a statement issued by the Department of Justice:

“Today, Tairod Nathan Webster Pugh, a U.S. citizen and former member of the U.S. Air Force, was sentenced to 35 years in prison for attempting to provide material support to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), a designated foreign terrorist organization, and obstruction of justice.”

As reported by the New York Post, Pugh, ostensibly a big, tough jihadist, was in tears during his sentencing by U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis. Addressing the judge, Pugh said, “I am a black man, I am a military man, I am a Muslim man. I protected this country and the Constitution. And my service was repaid by stripping me of my career, shaming my wife, shaming my parents, shaming my children.”

If Pugh was seeking sympathy from Garaufis, it was not forthcoming.

“This isn’t about whether you’re Muslim or Christian or Jewish,” said the judge to the defendant before handing down his decision. “This is about whether you’re going to stand up for your country, which has done so much for you, or betray your country.”

“You made your choice,” proclaimed the judge. “I have no sympathy.”

Boom.

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